Tomato Matters

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Rough Weather Got You Worried About Your Tomato Garden This Year?

Posted by on Mar 4, 2014 in classes, News and Events, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Don’t despair – Knowing how to prepare your soil and water effectively will allow your tomato garden to flourish this summer!

It’s been a tough winter across the country…Some are enduring one polar vortex after another and here on the west coast, with almost no snow to speak of, we’re wondering how we’re going to be able to garden at all without any water.

It’s sad to think that we may have to amend our gardening plans and possibly not enjoy that activity that brings us so much pleasure, not to mention really tasty gifts from the garden this summer!

Don’t despair, though. Knowing how to water your tomatoes and how to make your soil work for you will allow you to grow a great crop this year!

Whether you’re a tomato novice or a seasoned grower in the Southern California area,  you’ll want to learn how to grow in this unique growing climate. That’s why we’re offering our garden tour and TOMATO ‘SSENTIALS class at a reduced price this year. We want you to be successful in the garden, not just wishing you could be! The class will be held on Sunday, March 16, in the Tomato Matters Garden. In this class you’ll learn Six “Ssential” Steps for Tomato Success, yes, the ‘Ssentials for growing great tomatoes!

There’s lots of new information so the class is perfect for the first time grower as well as those experienced gardeners who need a refresher or to be updated. You’ll go home with a complete handout and a tomato plant to get your garden started.

Best of all, we’ve lowered the price of the class so more people can participate. Even more great tomato information at a better price. You don’t want to miss it!

For time, price and to reserve your spot for this fun morning in the garden, click here.  See you in the garden!

Tomato Growing Essentials

 

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The Seed Catalog Conundrum Part Two – Choosing The Seeds

Posted by on Feb 5, 2013 in gardening, News and Events, Uncategorized | 0 comments

So, back to selecting your seeds.  You’ve got a pile of seed catalogs, everything looks fabulous, and you don’t know what to order. Ordering everything seems easiest or maybe ordering nothing.

No!! Neither option is a good one!  Start by thinking about how much you want to grow. How much space do you have? And how much of that space will get enough sun, at least 8 hours per day (more for larger tomatoes) to successfully grow tomato plants?  Do you have a favorite variety that you want to have a lot of?  Do you want to grow tomatoes to eat sliced or in a salad or do you prefer to grow for sauces or canning?

Once you establish what you really like to do with your tomatoes and about how many you can grow, start thinking about the tomatoes you’ve enjoyed in the past. This is where keeping a garden journal comes in.  Look at your notes. If Green Zebra didn’t do well in your extreme heat, cross that one off your list.  If  Kellogg’s Breakfast loved the heat (it does),  and you absolutely loved the flavor, it would be a good one to grow again.

I like to break down my seeds list into color categories. If I don’t, I’m liable to end up growing a whole lot of bi-colored, sweet tomatoes and not have much to can for later use.  So, I make a chart, as seen in the photo below.  As you’ll see, I have each color listed and then different varieties within each color column. I’ve also included a very important number. This is often referred to at DTM or Day To Maturity.  This is not an absolute but an approximation of how long it will take to produce ripe tomatoes once planted in the ground.  Since many of these varieties are new to me, I’ve also decided to include a quick note about size when ready to harvest. Tomato Seed List 2013

Now comes the fun part.  Juggle.  Mix it up.  You don’t want to have all medium-sized  red tomatoes coming in at the exact same time.  Remove a few reds and add a few  somewhere else.   In fact, you don’t want all of your tomatoes ripening at once.  Choose some that are early producers (55 – 60 days), some that are late (90 – 100 days) and some that will produce mid-season (75 – 80 days).  Ultimately, you want to have a variety of colors and sizes coming in at any given time.  You want diversity to keep things delicious and interesting.

Ok – you’re ready.  Grab those seed catalogs, make your list and order!  It’s almost time to start your seeds!

 

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2013 Tomato Growing Guide Calendar Now Available!

Posted by on Sep 28, 2012 in News and Events, Uncategorized | 0 comments

We’ve gone live ahead of schedule and we’re ready to fill your orders for 2013 Tomato Growing Guide~Calendars placed on Amazon!

Order yours today!
2013 Tomato Growing Guide~Calendar!
Order your 2013 Tomato Growing Guide~Calendar Here

It’s time to purchase your 2013 Tomato Growing Guide and Calendar, your customized guide to growing delicious tomatoes anywhere in the country! We’re kicking off calendar sales on Amazon with a really great deal for you!

 

 Remember those Mighty ‘Matos, the grafted tomato plants I’ve been raving about? To thank you for ordering  your calendar before October 15  we’re going to send  you the Coupon Code to save $10 on your order of Mighty ‘Matos from GardenLife.  Start growing earlier, extend your growing season, enjoy disease resistant tomato plants and harvest more tomatoes than ever!
 
Are You in Los Angeles??
If you’re in the L.A.  area on Monday come celebrate the Amazon launch with us!  
Join us at the hottest new restaurant in Studio City,  Pizza Rev, and sample some of their custom made pizza with homemade dough,  a selection of sauces, incredibly fresh ingredients on a thin, crispy crust!  We’ll give away free tomato recipes and have an all around good time!
Monday, October 1
6 -8 pm
Pizza Rev
12103 Ventura Boulevard
Studio City

Not in the area?? Share the invitation with your tomato loving friends that are!
All tomato lovers are welcome!
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